Will Fringe See a Fifth Season?

Eric Goldman, IGN:

[According to Co-creator/Executive Producer J.J Abrams], “I don’t know. For some sick reason, I’m hopeful, because the show… There’s some stuff coming up that’s so great. They’re doing such amazing work. Maybe it’s just that dumb optimism of hoping that when good work is done, it gets rewarded. I think that some of the work they’re doing, that Jeff [Pinkner] and Joel [Wyman] are working on now, is so good that I’m just crossing my fingers that it gets to continue. And if not, on FOX, maybe somewhere else.”

It’s a damn shame that great shows don’t always get great ratings. If you appreciate sci-fi and suspense, this show is definitely up your alley.

Here’s hoping the show continues and doesn’t suffer the same fate as Pushing Daisies, another brilliant show that got canned due to low ratings.

Why Alphas Is Better Than Heroes

Corrina Lawson, Wired.com:

I had no interest in Alphas at first. I’d been burned badly on Heroes with its never-ending loop of returning characters to the same place and plot arcs that didn’t pay off and dropped storylines. I concluded television just didn’t know how to do superheroes right and, besides, Alphas was on the Syfy Channel, not exactly known for high-quality shows.

But when I was flipping channels, I caught a tense scene between David Strathairn and someone holding him at knifepoint. I thought, “this looks very good.” I DVR’d all the episodes, started watching and realized that while Heroes had gone in the wrong direction after a promising first season, Alphas was already better than its predecessor had ever been.

Even when my friends proclaimed Heroes had jumped the shark, I still had a soft spot for it and wanted it to succeed. But it just went downhill and fizzled out.

Alphas is quite refreshing and gives the hero formula a healthy dose of reality. Nine episodes in, it just keeps getting better. Here’s hoping they keep up the pace.

Magical Negro

TV Tropes:

In order to show the world that minority characters are not bad people, one will step forward to help a “normal” person, with their pure heart and folksy wisdom. They are usually black and/or poor, but may come from another oppressed minority. They step (often clad in a clean, white suit) into the life of the much more privileged (and, in particular, almost always white) central character and, in some way, enrich that central character’s life.  […]

With such deep spiritual wisdom (and sometimes — though not always — actual supernatural powers), you might wonder why the Magical Negro doesn’t step up and save the day himself. This will never happen. So enlightened and selfless is he that he has no desire to gain glory for himself; he only wants to help those who need guidance…which just happens to mean those who are traditionally viewed by Hollywood as better suited for protagonist roles, not, say, his own oppressed people. In fact, the Magical Negro really seems to have no goal in life other than helping white people achieve their fullest potential; he may even be ditched or killed outright once he’s served that purpose. If he does express any selfish desires, it will only be in the context of helping the white protagonists realize their own racism and thereby become better people.

I <3 Morgan Freeman.